Videos, Podcasts, and Photo Presentations

We hope you enjoy the video, podcasts, and photos presented here. The Chippewa Valley Museum collects, preserves, and displays important, regional, cultural artifacts from the Chippewa Valley. See you at the museum soon.

Sounds Like Home Podcasts

The Sounds Like Home audio series covers music and everyday life in Wisconsin's Chippewa Valley. In six episodes, we present the voices of regional musicians telling their own stories.

Sounds Like Home is an initiative of the Chippewa Valley Museum. It’s a regional music documentation project that spans field research, a museum exhibit, and this podcast. Sounds Like Home is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts with additional funding by the Wisconsin Arts Board.


Eau Claire’s Larry Lompa introduces us to the accordion’s lesser-known cousin, the Chemnitzer concertina. His own cousin, Bob Cynor, explains the Polish polka subgenre of Chicago “honky” music.


The members of Lac Du Flambeau drum group Tomahawk circle describe life on the intertribal powwow circuit. Accordion player Ryan Herman reminisces about how he started gigging with his dad’s band, the Rhythm Playboys.



Theresa Slipek describes secretly shirking household chores to teach herself the concertina. Iris Carufel talks about interpreting gender roles across Native American music contexts.

    John Till, 1908.
    He didn’t look like a Doctor. John Till was usually unshaven, barefoot, and wore earrings. But odds were good he could help you. Born in Austria, he immigrated to Wisconsin in 1898.

    John Till, 1908-1910.
    He worked first as a lumberjack near Almena, about 60 miles north of here. He began healing people with a special technique he’d learned from a Swiss doctor. By mixing Croton oil (now considered highly dangerous) and kerosene into a paste, he applied it to a person's back to draw out illness.

    Crowding their way in to be treated by John Till, Almena, 1908-1910. Word spread across the Chippewa Valley and people came in droves—some from as far away as Canada. Local residents benefited from Till's success, renting rooms and serving meals to his patients. He worked 16 hour days, but didn’t charge for his services.

    Crowd waiting outside Till Hotel to see John Till, 1908-1910.
    My mother had a tumor growing under her arm. It was operated on but it grew again. So she went to Dr. Till and his plaster drie[d] it out and she wasn't bothered anymore. --Flo Hinterberg Kurth, Postcard, 1908

    John Till, 1908.
    Although he was sentenced to jail for practicing medicine without a license, 6,500 people petitioned against it and Till never served time. In 1922, he left the Chippewa Valley and the U.S., returning again after World War II.